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The Ugly Truth: Wallpaper Removal Blows

I’m spending my Friday morning with a home inspector. Since there is nothing for me to do during this 1+ hour inspection, I decided to try to remove the wallpaper in the guest room.

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Not sure if you can tell but it’s textured wallpaper that has been painted. It was going to cost me between $500-1000 to have it removed or re-drywalled so I figured I’d go buy $25 worth of materials and give it a whirl.

15 minutes in:

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All hopes that it would peel off in full sheets are dashed. Still not sure what type of wallpaper it is.

30 minutes in:

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It’s coming off and definitely not one of the worst things I’ve ever done. I’ll keep pushing through until the inspector finishes and see how far I’ve come.

This much left to go:

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Wish me luck! Happy Friday!!

Custom Tie Storage

I thought it would be a good way to end the week with an easy DIY project (which never seems to be the case!). My hubby has to wear a suit (and tie) every day for work. Accordingly, our closets were overrun with ties and traditional hanging tie storage didn’t seem to make much sense.  So here’s what I came up with:

I didn’t take many pictures of the process the first time I did this project but I recreated the same drawer in our new apartment.  It’s a much smaller drawer so not as perfect but at least we have pics!

I started out by using these custom drawer dividers.

3 Inch High Kit-White Polystyrene Drawer Dividers

These were extremely easy to use but not terribly cheap.  I think I spent $60 on 3 of these packages.  However, I only needed two packages to complete both projects so I guess that isn’t too bad.

Anyway, the drawer dividers come with these sticky strips that allow you to create as many connections as you need.

You take these boards, score them and break apart to create the dividers that attach to each of the connectors.

So here’s the process:

1. Measure the width of the object (e.g. tie) and decide how wide the space between each row needs to be.  For the purpose of my project, I determined that 4″ would be the perfect size and would allow me to maximize the tiny drawer space.

2. Then you apply the connector strips on each side of the drawer.

3. Insert the divider in the connector strip to  make sure that your measurements were correct.

4. Then apply the connector strips spaced out thru the drawer.

5. Insert all the dividers.

6. Voila! Roll your ties, sort (sorta) by color, and you now have great tie storage.

This project was fairly simple and took less than an hour to complete.  But the best part is that my hubby actually uses it and rolls his ties back up at the end of the day.  No more ties on the back of chairs, the end of the bed, etc.  It’s the little things in life.

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